Cerebral Palsy Research Network Blog

CPRN Founder Receives University of Utah Faculty Appointment

Paul H. Gross

Paul H. Gross

The Cerebral Palsy Research Network (CPRN) Founder and Chairman, Paul Gross, has been appointed to the faculty of the University of Utah’s (U of U) Health Services Innovation and Research (HSIR) Division of the Department of Population Health Sciences within the U of U School of Medicine. His appointment is as an Adjunct Assistant Professor. Gross has had a long-standing relationship with the University of Utah since he co-founded the Hydrocephalus Clinical Research Network with U of U neurosurgeon John Kestle, M.D., in 2006.

“Our mission in HSIR is to bridge from research to practice. Working with thinkers like Paul is essential to our mission,” said University of Utah’s Rachel Hess, MD, HSIR Division Chief. “Moving knowledge forward in dynamic ways that are not always typical in academia is critical to future health. Paul helps us keep that mission at the forefront.”

The founding of CPRN established a deep working relationship among faculty members in HSIR and Gross. CPRN leaders Susan Horn, Ph.D. and Jacob Kean, Ph.D., faculty at University of Utah, saw the opportunity to expand research capabilities by partnering more closely with him.

Paul Gross has a track record in creating clinical research infrastructure with business leadership skills that accelerate the pace of biomedical research. As faculty of the University of Utah, Gross will have broad access to the rich and diverse set of people, knowledge, and infrastructure to facilitate high-quality research to improve outcomes for people impacted by neurological disorders.

Established in 2014, HSIR does research that affects virtually everyone every day. The HSIR lab is clinical healthcare. The goal is that every patient has access to care that is timely, personalized and safe. The University of Utah was established in 1850 and ranks among the top 50 U.S. universities by total research expenditures with over $486 million spent in 2014 per the National Science Foundation.